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Merry Christmas from everyone at Golf Design & Management

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2018 has been another fantastic year for the whole team at Golf Design & Management.

This year, we have even been busier than ever before.

Our Golf Management and Golf Course Design teams have been all across the UK and the World, visiting new areas and meeting new people from across the world every day of the week.

Despite being busier, we are proud that we have still been able to provide the same high level of design service as before, going that extra mile to ensure our clients receive the golf courses and advice that is right for their club and members.

Without doubt, we are the number one Golf Course Design & Management firm in the UK and the first choice for many clients across the world.

2017 promises to be another exciting year with new miniature golf and 18 hole golf courses in development in multiple continents with new members of staff and skills being added to the team so please stay in touch to keep up with all our latest news and updates.

Not to mention golf lessons currently taking place at The Sunderland Golf Centre, if are interested in lessons for yourself or as a great xmas present please get in touch!!!

From everyone at Golf Design & Management have a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

Dean Bailey returns to Centurion Park to find a course improving quickly

There has been a lot of change and at Centurion Park since my last visit. Today you’ll find a golf course which has come a long way in a short time thanks to the arrival of head greenkeeper John Grey, formerly of Middlesbrough Municipal.

The traditional English parkland course is improving week-on-week, the members tell me while walking the fairways, while the tall tress lining the fairways present a far sterner test at this 6,000 yard layout than they did back in 1973 when the course opened.

To read the full article from Northern Golfer Click link below.

Norther Golfer Article - Centurion Park life

Dean Bailey heads north to Burgham Park, a stern parkland test which is back to its best.

The Andrew Mair and Mark James-designed Burgham Park has long been one of Northumberland’s toughest parkland courses with its challenging green complexes, huge bunkers and length from the back tees proving difficult for those looking to overpower the golf course.

Set in rolling Northumberland countryside, Burgham is an excellent design which, while testing the bigger hitters to attack the tighter lines and more precise targets, allows high handicappers more generous sections of fairway to provide a playable and fun set of 18 holes.

Opened in 1994, the course’s championship pedigree – it has hosted the PGA North Region Championship three times – can be found from the back tees, which can stretch to 7,065 yards while many will find far more enjoyment from the yellow tees – at 6,352 yards.

To read the full article from Northern Golfer Click link below.

Norther Golfer Article - Burgham Reborn

Whickham Golf Club was founded in 1911 and moved to its present site at Hollinside Park in 1938. The lodges at the club entrance marked one of the main entrances to Gibside Estate.

This excellent parkland course leaves a lasting impression on visitors; set in the beautiful Derwent Valley it has outstanding views of scenic countryside, extending to the Cheviots in the north. The acclaimed architecture of Gibside Hall and its Orangery, and the romantic ruins of Hollinside Hall provide a historic backdrop. Visitors will be enthralled by the views, peace, tranquility and wildlife which enhances the golf course. This is a course to be enjoyed all year round.

Refinements to the course completed in 2016 produced the Hollinside Park course that we play today. The project was designed by Andrew Mair & Mark James’ Golf Design & Management Company. Successfully creating a layout that reflects the character of the original course, and provides a testing but fair examination that rewards accuracy over power.

Support from Sport England enabled the Club to expand its practice facilities. The result has provided an indoor Swing Studio with its GC2 Simulator where Club PGA Professional John Paul delivers lessons and club fitting all year around. Additionally, there is a 3 bay, covered driving range and short game practice area close to the clubhouse.

House Manager, Stephen Fawcus and his team will ensure that your clubhouse experience is all it should be. The Clockburn Restaurant caters for up to 100 seated or 150 for an informal Buffet.

Membership Options (full details available on application). Full 7, 6 and 5 Day, Pay & Play, 9 Hole, 5 Day, Academy, Corporate and Social Membership.

Added value for full membership includes MasterKey Membership is One FREE round at each of our associate clubs;
Beamish Park, Chester-le-St, Durham City, Eaglescliffe and Wearside.

For more details contact the Club;
Whickham Golf Club,
Hollinside Park,
Fellside Road,
Whickham,
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE16 5BA.

Tel: 0191 488 1576
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web; www.whickhamgolfclub.co.uk

Course 18 holes. Par71. CSS 71.

Total Distance
White Tees 6286 yds
Yellow Tees 6095 yds
Red Tees 5567 yds

Features
PGA Pro John Paul’s Golf Shop. Coaching and Club Fitting
Putting Green.
Short Game Practice Area.
3 bay covered Driving Range.
Teach & Play Studio with Fully GC2 Equipped Simulator and Flight Scope.
Buggies, Fairway Riders, & Trolleys for Hire.
Fully stocked Bar & Restaurant.
Snooker Room with 2 full size tables.
Short Game Practice Area.

Whickham Golf Club expansion on par - sponsored feature

One of the more challenging golf courses in the north east region, founded 1911, is on course to expand. Whickham Golf Club are progressing with their course development plans. The Nordmann course no longer exists. The two holes that were in Snipes Dene have been returned to Mother Nature due to our inability to maintain them to the same high standards as the rest of the course. A decision was taken to develop and re-configure the course layout to replace them.

The original Crombie course will be expanded from a men’s par 68 into a men’s par 71 and Par 72 to a Par 74 for the Ladies. This will happen in two phases.

Phase one will re-design our 16th hole from a par 4 to a Par 5. We will begin the 2015 season with course as a par 69. The course will be re-branded and named Hollinside Park.

Phase 2 will introduce two new holes for the season commencing 2016. The changes will also provide a par 5, third hole blended from our original third tee and extending into the original fourth quarry hole. This is followed by a new par 4, fourth hole. The fifth is a new par 3 with outstanding views from Bird Hill.

The design of the new 4th hole and the redesign of the Par 3, 5th hole modify the existing undulations of the land on which it is being built. This helps to reduce the amount or earth that has to be moved and helps to fit the course into the landscape more naturally.

The new green that has been constructed is following the USGA recommended construction model for sand based greens and incorporates a herringbone drainage system, drainage raft layer and an exact depth of root zone that meets required specifications for this type of construction. The construction is similar to the existing greens and will therefore allow management of the new holes to continue seamlessly within the existing layout.

The extensions and alterations to the existing par 3, fifth hole will accommodate the change of direction in play. The modifications will be carried out in the same way to ensure that the new green surface performs exactly as the existing ones. The new mounds, either side of the new green along with inclusion of a tree line and mounding at the back of the green will help to frame the green and provide a fair test of accuracy from the new tees.

The project is being masterminded by Andrew Mair’s Golf Design & Management Company. The brief is to create a layout that reflects the character of the original course. To produce a testing but fair examination that rewards accuracy over power.

The summary of both phases provides a more balanced course and par 71 for men and a par 74 for ladies. They think the final layout will be enjoyed by members and prove even more attractive to visitors.

With 5, 6 & 7 day membership fees frozen until 2017 there has never been a better time to join this great club.

View Whickham Golf Club

Original article can be read at www.southmoorgc.co.uk

Danny Willett is not the only Yorkshireman to make his mark on the US Masters. Augusta National was created by Dr Alister MacKenzie, born in Leeds and the son of a Scottish doctor.

The course at South Moor in County Durham opened in 1923, having been designed by MacKenzie, a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame. MacKenzie’s portfolio also includes Royal Melbourne and Cypress Point, dramatically overlooking the Pacific Ocean on the Monterey Peninsula in California.

Who better to tell golfers about the South Moor experience than Andrew Mair, a course designer of 45 years’ experience and a keen student of MacKenzie’s work? A member of the Northumberland club, Andrew is in partnership with a former Ryder Cup captain, Mark James, in the Cramlington company Andrew Mair & Mark James Golf Design.

We invited Andrew to play South Moor and write about the course. This was the result of that invitation . . .

‘A fine example of MacKenzie at his best’
By ANDREW MAIR

NOWHERE on the fascinating heathland course at South Moor is Dr Alister MacKenzie’s influence more evident than in the free flowing greens which were to become his trademark on future courses, including Augusta National.

Fast and mainly vast, the speed adds to the challenge of negotiating the contours, swales, crowns, tiers and terraces with which MacKenzie has endowed these beautifully shaped greens.

It is slopes on greens of this kind which are so often overlooked in designing a golf course and it is one of the most difficult things imaginable to construct them really well. Subtleties of this nature make all the difference between a good course and a bad one.

South Moor is set in 187 acres of stunning County Durham countryside and started life as a miners only Coal Board club in 1923. Given the “Made by MacKenzie” connection with the Masters, here is a course which has gone from miners to majors.

Amid a natural terrain punctuated by gorse, heather and bracken, the sloping and undulating rig and furrow fairways on the par fours and fives encourage a sense of adventure.

As MacKenzie put it in his 1920 book Golf Architecture: “There are few things more monotonous than always playing from a dead flat fairway.”

At the fifth, for example, there is a huge drop from right to left around a towering green up high and hewn out of the side of a hill, with massive trouble down to the left. Talk about the wow factor!

At the ninth, failing to clear the mounding at the front of a green hidden above you – MacKenzie was the British Army’s camouflage expert in World War I – means the ball will run back down towards you.

In golf architecture and camouflage psychology is of enormous value. It enables one to judge what is likely to give pleasurable excitement to the golfer and improvement in moral to the soldier.

The tenth has the awesome feel of an amphitheatre and, like so many other parts of the course, the gorse and the heather around the turn add to the charm.

This is a reminder that when men like MacKenzie, a protégé of the great Harry Colt, designed courses, they did so with nature in mind as well as the golfers.

The 13th has a 70-yard green, the longest in Durham County. This means a three-club difference for your approach shot depending on the pin position.

Overall, members here clearly revel in a risk and reward experience as against a mean spirited slog with scorecard and pencil the only motivating factor.

South Moor is visual proof that the ideal course designer needs the soul of an artist, the brain of an engineer and the heart of a golfer. Each hole is individually designed and not only are there are no replicas, but also what you get here you can’t get anywhere else.

You never see any MacKenzie green repeated anywhere. Every green he ever created is different yet a lot of modern course architects roll out a template. So their fourth hole on one course might be a ninth hole somewhere else.

As you part company with this course, it’s worth reflecting on how much poorer golf in County Durham would have been if MacKenzie had not been a friend of Basil Sadler, managing director of Holmside & South Moor Collieries.

Although, like the coal mines, both men are sadly no longer with us, the name MacKenzie is forever enshrined in the World Golf Hall of Fame. The club motto at South Moor, nil nisi optimum, is appropriate. Translated from the Latin, it means “nothing but the best”.

Andrew Mair & Mark james Golf Design & Management are pleased to announce that they have secured the contract to design & construct a brand new 18 hole golf course, golf academy & miniature golf course at the new Rock City Development in Ghana.

Rock City Development in GhanaAndrew Mair said "I have visited the site on numerous occasions and find the scenery and natural landscape absolutely breathtaking. Not only will this offer a fantastic place for play golf but also a place to soak up the best of what nature has to offer". (more pictures to follow)

Our company is very excited to have be commissioned for such a prestigious project and plan to have the golf academy and miniature golf course ready for play Easter 2017.

The first 9 holes of the golf course will be ready for play summer 2018, and the final 9 holes by spring 2019.

 

If you have any questions regarding this or any past developments Andrew Mair & Mark James Golf Design has undertaken or are intenrested in your own Golf, Mini Golf, Foot Golf project, simply get in touch here.

Largest Astro Turf Green in UK, designed by Andrew Mair Golf

County Durham golf club South Moor have taken their total of grant aid past the £100,000 mark in five years following an award of £4,926 of National Lottery money from Sport England’s Flood Relief Fund.

Just over half the total assistance has been funded by Sport England with the remainder provided by Stanley Area Action Partnership and Stanley Town Council. A vast overhaul of the 93-year-old former “miners only” Coal Board club, where the course was designed by the man who created Augusta National, Dr Alister MacKenzie, began in 2011. South Moor staged the McGregor Trophy, the England Boys Under-16 Open won by City of Newcastle player Jack Hermeston. Stanley Area Action Partnership awarded the golf club a £23,000 grant to stage the event and £2,000 for car park improvements.

Hosting an international tournament previously won by golfers such as Justin Rose, Edoardo Molinari and Graeme Storm drastically raised the profile of the club. So much so, South Moor attracted 80 new members and in 2012 committee man and former captain Guy Carr won England Golf’s Club Development Award. Carr, also a PGA Level One golf coach, is the major driving force behind the club’s fund raising.

South Moor Golf Our facilities have improved beyond all recognition over the last five years”, said Carr, a 51-year-old IT consultant who lives in Chester-le-Street. These are fantastic times in terms of our rapid development and they are the reward for vast amounts of hard work by many people at the club and at the public bodies who have funded us.

We are getting near to completing a par three course and there is an Astroturf short game practice area covering 1,668 square metres which is the biggest of its kind in Europe and includes a practice bunker. We have totally refurbished top class changing rooms, showers and lockers and an extra putting green – part of the Astroturf area – and a new practice driving area.

Funding also allowed South Moor to be chosen to host the inaugural North of England Under-14 Open in 2014. Carr added: We put it on again in 2015 and after last year’s event we were announced as the permanent home of the tournament. So we have made the most of every last penny in what is a total of £104,196 of public money we have received starting with that great catalyst for us, the McGregor Trophy. Our MP, Kevan Jones, helped us secure the funding for that tournament and assisted us in other ways.

The latest grant, from the Flood Relief Fund, came after South Moor’s Said Carr: Paths were washed out, making buggy access impossible, and in places they were dangerous and impassable. Elderly and physically impaired golfers were prevented from using the course. As a result of the Sport England grant we have been able to plan a refurbishment and a repair program for the paths ready for the start of our 2016 season. We have also made plans to replace a 60 metre underground pipe at the end of the summer. MP Jones said: I was very pleased to hear about this latest funding which provides another welcome boost for the golf club and local community.

The club has gone from strength to strength over the last few years, successfully hosting big tournaments, whilst also remaining an important local facility. I look forward to seeing the next stages in the development of the club. Jennie Price, Chief Executive of Sport England, said: We appreciate sport isn’t a major priority when people’s lives, homes and businesses are at risk from flooding.

But once communities are starting to get their lives back to normal, being able to use their local pitch or sports club as usual can make a real difference. By launching this fund quickly to help with clean-up and repair costs I hope we can give people affected by the floods one less thing to worry about. We are delighted to be able to get this emergency funding to South Moor.

*COMMUNITY conscious South Moor have introduced a new Lifestyle Membership this year costing £170 and giving a 70% discount off all green fees. For details, visit www.southmoorgc.co.uk and click on club then Lifestyle Membership.

 

If you have any questions about what we are up to or how we can help you Click Here

Hello, I’m Ian Payne, and if you recognise my voice from the Tyne Tees news on ITV, then now you know my guilty secret . . . I’m a ?-handicap golfer, As “The Voice of South Moor”, I am guiding you round each hole of a fascinating heathland course designed by the same genius who created Augusta National . . . Dr Alister MacKenzie. South Moor started life as a miners only Coal Board club in 1923. So given the “Made by MacKenzie” connection with the US Masters, here is a course which has gone from miners to majors . . .

Hole 1

MacKenzie used natural terrain everywhere he went and the par three first has its own character, not just because the green slopes from back to front. If you land in one of the greenside bunkers, you need to take note of the undulations facing you before excavating yourself from the sand.
Each hole is individually designed and there are no replicas. Plus, what you get here you can’t get anywhere else. You never see a MacKenzie green repeated anywhere. Every one he created is different yet many modern course architects roll out a template.

Hole 2

The green on a par five double dogleg has no bunkers, but runs entirely from right to left and there is a gathering point past the low side where misdirected shots often congregate. The celebrated course designer Andrew Mair, who has written a loving review of the course for this website, tells me South Moor is an important contribution to Britain’s golfing heritage, great fun to play and a fine example of MacKenzie at his best. On all the par fours and par fives, the sloping and undulating rig and furrow fairways makes it impossible for you to have a boring round.

Hole 3

This par three provides an outstanding example of a MacKenzie green, two tiers, 50-50, and not too severely sloped so the green keeper can cut the grass without scalping the green. Players who enjoy the challenge of testing their putting skills on a MacKenzie trademark so evident at Augusta National – beautifully shaped greens which are mainly vast, fast, varied and sloping – will get a thrill out of playing this course. The speed adds to the challenge of negotiating the contours, swales, crowns, tiers and terraces with which MacKenzie has endowed the beautifully shaped greens of South Moor.

Hole 4

The first of six par fours in a row arrives at the fourth, where the green has two bunkers to the right. The main tier is at the front of the green which runs off to the back. When the going is hard and running, you need to carefully judge bringing your approach shot in from the right to hit the left-to-right sloping green. Aim left from the tee so the ball will run down the camber to the middle of the fairway. In gauging your second shot, a slight hollow in front of the green makes it look shorter.

Hole 5

Andrew Mair describes this as a “wow” factor hole. There is a huge drop from right to left at a towering green up high and hewn out of the side of a hill, with massive trouble down to the left. The green is so high up for your second shot that most golfers need to aim well to the right of it. In doing so they must judge the effect of the most severe slope on the course which can easily take your ball across the green to a no-go area alongside the green, on the left. It’s a jungle down there.

Hole 6

This time, it is the tee which is up high and committee man Guy Carr says you can see seven golf clubs from the back of the tee: Boldon, Birtley, Hobson, Houghton-le-Spring, Ravensworth, Roseberry Grange Community and Wearside. For a blind tee shot over a hill, the line is the greenhouse on the horizon. The green is protected by a horseshoe of four brilliantly positioned bunkers guarding the front and sides of the green and everything runs away from you. You need to just clear which ever bunker you are coming in over with your approach shot.

Hole 7

Another downhill hole, this is a definite birdie chance although there are two fairway bunkers 50 yards from the green at a point where the fairway narrows. Before embarking on this visual tour of the course I picked the brains not only of Andrew Mair but also the club PGA pros, Shaun Cowell and Mark Ridley, who have written excellent hole by hole tips for this website. Here, they advise you to lay up and keep left, because right is out of bounds. With your second shot, allow for the green rolling away from you. Take care, especially when the greens are fast.

Hole 8

After you have, ideally, faded your tee shot over a ditch and round through a gap in the trees, you will find there is more room to your right than you expect when you look out from the tee. Your approach shot will be at a green sloping left to right. Get below the hole because otherwise you can easily three putt on a big green. Slopes on a green of this kind are often overlooked in designing a golf course and it is one of the most difficult things imaginable to construct them really well.

Hole 9

A tight uphill second shot demands accuracy and judgment of distance, or the ball will roll back down towards you if you don’t get over the mounding at the front of the green. Yet you need to be below the hole to give yourself an uphill putt on a green sloping from right to left! In the pros’ opinion, this is the hardest hole on the course and not for nothing was MacKenzie the British Army’s camouflage expert in World War I. Also, bear in mind a meaningful Andrew Mair statistic . . . 80% of golfers never get past the pin!

Hole 10

The back nine starts with a downhill par five, a nice driving hole which has a ditch running across the fairway 40 yards in front of a long heart shaped green guarded by bunkers front left and right. This hole has the awesome feel of an amphitheatre and, like so many other parts of the course, the gorse and the heather around the turn add to the charm. This is a reminder that when men like MacKenzie, a protégé of the great Harry Colt, designed courses, they did so with nature in mind as well as the golfers.

Hole 11

Here is visual proof that the ideal course designer needs the soul of an artist, the brain of an engineer and the heart of a golfer. This is what you expect from a MacKenzie par three with bunkers front left and right of the green, a stream right and no bunker in front of the green. MacKenzie disliked stopping a golfer hitting a good shot finding the green. It’s about two club lengths’ distance from front to back of the green and the hole seems to play longer than its yardage. Leave the ball below the flag for an uphill putt.

Hole 12

The stroke index one is a par five and a good uphill hole driving over a ditch with out of bounds all the way on the right and you also get into trouble if you pull your shot. Like 9 and 10, there’s heather left and right. Your second shot, blind and uphill, needs to be aimed up the left side of the fairway because from here you can’t see a wall cutting in to the hole from the right. There is a slightly smaller green, which you expect for a par five, with bunkers front left and right.

Hole 13

You won’t be too upset if ever you have a brief wait on this tee, because you will be able to take a breather after a stiff climb while you were navigating the 12th. Here, this good looking par four is one of the hardest driving holes on the course with a ditch left and out of bounds right. The second shot is into the longest green in County Durham (70 yards). So taking into account the pin position, you need to think carefully about your club selection which can fluctuate wildly, especially if the wind is getting up.

Hole 14

The last Par 3 on the course, 25 yards longer than any of the other three at 186 yards off the competition tees . . . and the most beguiling. For most golfers, a good long iron is required to avoid the bunkers and try to leave the ball short of the pin to avoid a fast downhill putt. There are other hazards for wayward strikes, especially for some long handicappers who will need to use their driver. An example of the club motto, nil nisi optimum, which, when translated from the Latin, means “nothing but the best”.

Hole15

The par four signature hole, always impressive, becomes stunning when the heather is in full bloom but beauty can be skin deep. There is trouble everywhere including strategically placed streams, one down the left and another in front of the green. You need to hit the right side of the fairway to have most chance of taking bunkers out of play and hitting a raised green. An example of why anybody who is a member at South Moor clearly revels in a risk and reward experience as against a mean spirited slog with scorecard and pencil the only motivating factor.

Hole16

Unlike the 15th, caution is always the watchword on the last par five of this thinking golfer’s course because trying to cut off the corner on a severe dogleg right is a no-no. Any golfer playing South Moor is advised to read what the club pros suggest about how to play the 16th in their hole-by-hole guide on this website. It has been known for the more sadistic element of the membership to spectate at this hole in club majors . . . just to watch the carnage inflicted on the more foolhardy among their club colleagues!

Hole17

South Moor closes with two par fours and this tight driving hole slopes right to left. Although there is trouble you’ve got the flattest green on the course to look forward to once you have carried the bunker. Aim right off the tee. Too far left and you will be blocked out by a holly bush for your second shot. The considerable slope is a reminder of something Mackenzie, a Yorkshireman born in Leeds, wrote in his 1920 book Golf Architecture: “There are few things more monotonous than always playing from a dead flat fairway.”

Hole 18

This is a right to left dogleg downhill with the second shot crucial to a massive green where you can bounce the ball in because it slopes front to back and left to right. As you part company with the course, it’s worth reflecting golf in County Durham would have been poorer if MacKenzie had not been a friend of Basil Sadler, managing director of Holmside & South Moor Collieries. And although, like the coal mines, both men are sadly no longer with us, the name MacKenzie is forever enshrined in the World Golf Hall of Fame . . .

Andrew Mair, a keen student of Dr Alister MacKenzie’s creations, describes a round at South Moor. A member of the Northumberland club, Andrew is a partner with former Ryder Cup captain Mark James in the Cramlington based course design business Andrew Mair Golf.

Dr Alister MacKenzie is best known for creating Augusta National and his courses include Royal Melbourne and Cypress Point, dramatically overlooking the Pacific on the Monterey Peninsula in California.

But how many golfers know that South Moor in Stanley, County Durham – founded as a National Coal Board “miners only” club in 1923 – flies the MacKenzie flag in the North East?

Nowhere on this fascinating heathland course is his influence more evident than in the free flowing greens which were to become his trademark on future courses, including Augusta.

Fast and mainly vast, the speed adds to the challenge of negotiating the contours, swales, crowns, tiers and terraces with which MacKenzie has endowed the beautifully shaped greens of South Moor. Elsewhere, amid stunning natural terrain punctuated by gorse, heather and bracken, the sloping and undulating rig and furrow fairways encourage a sense of adventure.

As MacKenzie, a Yorkshireman born in Leeds, put it in his 1920 book Golf Architecture: “There are few things more monotonous than always playing from a dead flat fairway.”

Yet at the par three first, joy or sorrow mainly depends on avoiding the greenside bunkers, especially if the pin position is at the back.

The second, par five, is a double dog leg where you need to land the ball far enough right of the bunker-less green to avoid rolling off down a severe slope.

The par three third brings another outstanding example of a MacKenzie green, two tiers split 50-50 and surrounded by trees.

The first of six par fours in a row arrives at the fourth. When the going is hard and running, you need to carefully judge bringing your approach shot in from the right to hit the left-to-right sloping green.
At the fifth there is a huge drop from right to left around a towering green up high and hewn out of the side of a hill, with massive trouble down to the left. Talk about the wow factor!

On the sixth, it is the tee which is high up. My playing partner, committee man Guy Carr, pointed out that you can see seven golf clubs from this vantage point: Boldon, Birtley, Hobson, Houghton-le-Spring, Ravensworth, Roseberry Grange Community and Wearside.

You need to be accurate with your approach to clear the horseshoe of four brilliantly positioned bunkers guarding the front and sides of the green.

The seventh, also downhill, is a clear birdie chance although the fairway narrows into the green. At the eighth it is best to fade your tee shot to the right hand side of the fairway given your approach shot will be at a green sloping left to right.

At the ninth, failing to clear the mounding at the front of a green hidden above you (MacKenzie was the British Army’s camouflage expert in World War I) means the ball will run back down towards you. The back nine starts with a thrilling downhill par five which turns into an awesome amphitheatre around the green.

Strategically, you need to know that since a ditch was put in across the fairway in front of the green and its bunkers during 2008, the hole has never yielded more birdies.

The par three 11th has bunkers front left and right of the green with a stream right and the stroke index one 12th is a par five, a fine uphill hole where your blind second shot needs to be aimed along the left of the fairway.

The par four 13th has a 70-yard green, the longest in Durham County. This means a three-club difference for your approach shot depending on the pin position.

The long 14th is one of the finest par threes in the county. At 186 yards off the white tees there are all sorts of problems, especially for some long handicappers having to use their driver.

Next up is the signature hole. The par four 15th, always impressive, becomes absolutely stunning when the heather is in full bloom but its beauty can be skin deep. There is trouble everywhere including strategically placed streams, one down the left and another in front of the green.

You need to hit the right hand side of the fairway to have most chance of taking bunkers out of play and hitting a raised green.

The 16th is the last par five, a tight dog leg right which turns sharply almost at right angles around the trees. The ideal landing area for your drive is a mere 15 square yards and then your target is the smallest green on the course.

South Moor closes with two par fours. The 17th tee proves an expansive view disguising a tight driving hole and you’ve got the flattest green to look forward to once you have you carried the bunker.

The 18th is a right to left dogleg downhill with the second shot crucial to reaching a green where you can bounce the ball in because it slopes front to back and left to right.

To sum up, members here clearly revel in a risk and reward experience as against a mean spirited slog with scorecard and pencil the only motivating factor.

South Moor is a thinking golfers’ paradise. For connoisseurs of the sport, the course should not be missed.

Andrew Mair Golf and Management were delighted to be involved in the recent redesign and development of Whickham Golf Club

We designed two new holes and remodeled the existing 16th hole, converting it to a par 5 from a par 4

These improvements were featured in Golf Course Architecture

Whickham Golf Club

To discuss what Andrew Mair Golf and Management can do for your golf club, contact us today

Contact Andrew Mair Golf and Management, if you are looking to rejuvenate your golf course in 2015

 

We are here to help you improve your golf course and leisure facilities.

Andrew Mair Golf and Leisure works with your current ground staff to ensure we can achieve the best for your golf club.

Rejuvenating your course will help attract new members and help retain existing ones.

Our skilled planners will help you design every detail of the build to help attract new sponsor and corporate events.

For more information, contact the team at Andrew Mair Golf & Management today 

Andrew Mair Golf and Management is delighted to announce the opening of a new Miniature Golf course at The Jet Centre in Coleraine.

Miniature Golf The Jet Centre

The first Miniature Golf Course in Ireland for Harris Mini Golf was reported by local news paper The Coleraine Time

For more details or to discuss the installation of a mini golf course at your leisure facility, please contact Andrew Mair today. 

More images of the redesign golf course work carried out at South Moor Golf Club by Andrew Mair Golf & Management.

South Moor Golf Club Design South Moor Golf Club Management

 

For more details on how Andrew Mair Golf & Management can help design your new golf course, contact us today

These are the images of the astro turf practice green at South Moor Golf Club designed my Andrew Mair Golf & Management

Golf Course Installation 

Golf Course Installation UK

Golf Course Design                 Golf Course Design UK

For more details or for a quotation, contact Andrew Mair Golf & Management today 

2014 promises to be an exciting year for Andrew Mair Golf & Leisure.

We about to announce a new long term agreement with Lever Training to cement the strong foundations of the Lever/Mair Partnership.

Future updates will be shown on the website shortly, please stay tuned for more details.

For more information on how Andrew Mair Golf & Leisure can help your business grow, please contact us today

Journalist Paul Corney, from the highly popular Northern Golfer magazine, gives a fantastic review of Burgham Park - St. Aidan's Golf Course, proudly designed by Andrew Mair Golf & Management.

Brilliant Burgham

This article featured in the December 2013 edition of Northern Golfer.

"Burgham Park - St. Aidan's Golf Course is a true championship golf course, designed to test the best – it is a real treat to play and an experience to be savoured"

Brilliant Burgham

For more details on how Andrew Mair Golf & Management can transformer the fortunes of your Golf Club, please contact us today

Andrew Mair Golf & Management is pleased to announce a partnership agreement with Lever Training Ltd.

The main aim of this new partnership is train both Greenkeepers and Golf Club managers to a diploma level in the golf industry.

This training programme is for both UK and international students.

For more information please contact Andrew Mair Golf & Management to discuss the options available.

Lever Logo

Miniature GolfIt is with great pleasure that Andrew Mair Golf & Management can announce a new partnership agreement with Harris Miniature Golf Courses to look after their expanding interests in Europe.

Harris Miniature Golf is a 50 year old company that has built over 600 miniature golf courses worldwide. With Harris Miniature Golf their goal is to do everything they can to make a beautiful course that is interesting and fun to play.

A miniature golf course where each hole has its own unique putting challenge, with just the right amount of contouring and break. A course where all the holes play differently and have their own character.

Mini Golf

With elevated greens, beautiful landscapes and water obstacles, we strive to develop a truly creative mini golf course design for each customer's location.

I first worked with Harris Miniature Golf in 2008 at the Parklands Golf Centre in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, the professionalism shown by the team in the design & construction was there for all to see, opened on time and within budget.

MiniGolf

With golf going through a transition at the present time I see the Harris Miniature Golf courses being the first step in introducing people to this great game. It can be played and enjoyed by any age group.

I feel there is exciting times ahead and our company is very happy to be working alongside Harris Miniature Golf in Europe.

Unfortunately, over recent years, some Golf Courses and clubs have found a steady decrease in their visitor, player and membership numbers.

At Andrew Mair Golf & Management, we can help to reverse this trend at your golf club.

With our Golf Management packages, our experts will analyse every aspect of your club and course to make sure you can get the most out of your potential and bring success back to your golf course.

For more information or to arrange a meeting, contact Andrew Mair Golf & Management today

Development News - Highland Club, Ouro Preto, Brazil 

26th January 2010 | Published on bdaily.info

A North East firm has put together a consortium which is in the running to build several new football stadiums in Brazil ahead of the 2014 World Cup.

Newcastle-based Golf Design & Management (GDM) has brought together a group of heavyweight businesses from the sports consultancy and construction sectors to bid for a share of 11 contracts for new build stadiums across Brazil.

GDM, which is primarily involved in designing and managing the construction of golf courses and resorts around the world, is hopeful of winning up to five of the contracts.

A decision on the contracts will be made by Brazilian state authorities - in partnership with football's governing body FIFA - by the end of this year.

If successful, GDM will work alongside global construction firms Davis Langdon and Waterman Group, sports turf specialist SIS and Top Green – a French firm which develops grass suitable for various sports.

Brazil will host the World Cup for the second time in the tournament's history in 2014 and the country's authorities are keen to upgrade the stadiums and surrounding infrastructure in the host cities.

GDM will draw on its expertise of managing the development of large-scale golf courses and related facilities such as hotels, access roads and entertainment venues.

Meanwhile, the Newcastle firm is confident that a multimillion-pound contract to build a golf course in Brazil – which has been on hold during the last two years of economic downturn – will finally begin moving towards completion in the next few months.

The company has been waiting since 2007 for the go-ahead to develop a course in the town of Ouro Preto, in the state of Minas Gerais.

As its partners on the project begin to recover from the global downturn, the development is likely to finally get underway.

GDM chairman Andrew Mair said the business was focused on the Brazilian market because of its impending emergence as a hotbed of global sports in the next decade.

He said: "With the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016, Brazil is now the sporting country of this decade. There's no doubt about it, sports are a huge part of the Brazilian economy."

GDM has developed over 160 golf resorts around the world and currently has projects in the pipeline in Mexico, Hungary, Poland, Italy and Cyprus.

The company, based in Newcastle's Generator Studios, is backed by former Ryder Cup captain Mark James.

Selected Projects

Selected examples of our golf course/facility design and construction.

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The Core Team

Introducing the expert team members behind Golf Design & Management

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Management Case Study

We work in focused partnerships with highly specialised Industry experts

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